The National Assembly For Wales


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#AskLlywydd – The Presiding Officer, Elin Jones AM, answers your questions

The Presiding Officer, Elin Jones AM, will be at the National Eisteddfod on 2 August in conversation with ITV Wales journalist Catrin Hâf Jones, talking about the unique challenges and opportunities she faces in the Fifth Assembly. The Presiding Officer will also answer questions from the audience and submitted through social media.

Questions can be sent in advance or on the day, either by using #AskLlywydd/#HoliLlywydd on Twitter, or by posting on the Assembly’s Facebook pages, where the session will be streamed live from 11:00am.

How do I watch?

If you are at the Eisteddfod you will be able to watch the interview live from 11:00am in the Societies 1 pavilion. If you are not able to attend we will be streaming the interview live in both English and Welsh to our Facebook accounts:

Assembly Wales Facebook

Cynylliad Cymru Facebook

You will also be able to watch the full interview on Senedd.tv after the event, along with transcripts.

How do I submit a question?

You can submit your questions for the Presiding Officer in a number of ways:

  • On Twitter – Follow @AssemblyWales on Twitter and reply to any tweets relating to this topic, or use the hashtag #AskLlywydd. Also feel free to Direct Message us if you’d like it to be confidential.
  • On Facebook – Like the Assembly’s Facebook Page and leave a comment on a relevant status. If you can’t see a relevant status then leave a comment on the page with the hashtag #AskLlywydd.
  • E-Mail – You can send your questions by e-mail to: communications@Assembly.Wales
  • On Instagram – If you can express your views in a creative visual way we’d love to see it. Tag our Senedd Instagram account within your picture or just use the hashtag #AskLlywydd. Alternatively you can leave a comment on any one of our Instagram posts again with the hashtag #AskLlywydd
  • On YouTube – Why not film yourself asking your question and then send us the link through any of the channels above?
  • Comments – Leave a comment on this blog post right now!

Need some ideas?

The Assembly for Wales can make laws in 21 devolved areas:

  • Agriculture, Forestry, Animals, Plants and Rural Development
  • Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings
  • Culture
  • Economic Development
  • Education and Training
  • Environment
  • Fire and Rescue Services and Fire Safety
  • Food
  • Health
  • Highways and Transport
  • Housing
  • Local government
  • National Assembly for Wales
  • Public Administration
  • Social Welfare
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Taxation
  • Tourism
  • Town and Country Planning
  • Water and Flood Defence
  • Welsh Language

Here are some further links that you may also find helpful:

Key Issues for the Fifth Assembly – This publication sets out a selection of issues likely to matter in the Fifth Assembly, from the steel industry to the future of Welsh law-making.

Wales and the EU: What does the vote to leave the EU mean for Wales? – Our Research Service explains what could happen after the Leave vote in Wales.

New Assembly Commission launches strategy for Fifth Assembly – News article about the new strategy for the fifth Assembly.

The Role of the Presiding Officer – Information about the role of the Presiding officer.

 More about Elin Jones AM, Presiding Officer

Elin Jones AM is the current Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales.

The Presiding Officer is the highest authority in the Assembly and chairs the meeting of all 60 Assembly Members in Plenary, remaining politically impartial at all times.

The Presiding Officer also plays an active role in representing the Assembly and Wales’s interests on a national, UK and international stage. They chair the Assembly Commission, which makes sure that Assembly Members have the staff and resources they need to carry out their roles effectively for the people of Wales.

The key functions of the Presiding Officer are:

  • to chair Plenary meetings;
  • to determine questions as to the interpretation or application of Standing Orders;
  • to represent the Assembly in exchanges with any other bodies, whether within or outside the United Kingdom, in relation to matters affecting the Assembly.

See also:

Llywydd gives evidence to Assembly Committee – Changes the Presiding Officer would like to make to the Wales Bill.

Elin Jones lays out what she wants to achieve as Presiding Officer of the National Assembly – An interview with WalesOnline on what the Presiding Officer wants to achieve in her role over the next five years.

What happens next?

Once all your questions have been collected, a few will be selected and answered on the day by the Presiding Officer.

We will collate your questions and pass them to Catrin Hâf Jones before the interview. She will then incorporate them into her conversation with Elin Jones AM, Presiding Officer. If you’re at the Eisteddfod you can come and watch the interview in person, or watch live via our Facebook pages. Afterwards, the conversation will be available online on Senedd.TV. We’ll let you know if your question was answered.

The Presiding Officer in conversation with Catrin Hâf Jones will take place on 2 August at 11:00am at the National Eisteddfod in Abergavenny.

We look forward to hearing your views!

If you are at the Eisteddfod you will be able to watch the interview live from 11:00am in the Societies 1 pavilion. If you are not able to attend we will be streaming the interview live in both English and Welsh to our Facebook accounts:

Assembly Wales Facebook

Cynylliad Cymru Facebook

You will also be able to watch the full interview on Senedd.tv after the event, along with transcripts.

View this post in Welsh


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“Listening to the interpreters showcase their talent was amazing. What a skill!”

Ffion at a translators desk

Ffion Pritchard joined the Assembly’s Translation and Reporting Service for the day last week after winning the Urdd translation competition. Here she talks about her experience behind the scenes and how the Assembly champions bilingualism.

I travelled by train to Cardiff Bay on Tuesday 12 July, a fine summer’s day, to spend the day on work experience with the Assembly’s Translation Unit—my reward for winning the Urdd translation competition.

A busy day had been planned for me. As part of the day, I met Mair, the head of the translation unit, and Mari Lisa, the competition adjudicator, and learnt about the business unit, transcribing the Record of Proceedings, translating legislation and the art of simultaneous interpretation. Thank you to Geth, Jodi, Llinos and Cai for all their help. I’m sure that the information they provided will be a great help to me in the future.

As well as meeting with, and working alongside, the translators and editors in the Translation Unit, I also attended meetings with two important people in the Senedd. In the morning, I had the opportunity to meet and have my photograph taken with the Presiding Officer; in the afternoon, Alun Davies, Minister for Lifelong Learning and Welsh Language, gave up his time to shake my hand and have a chat. Given that they are very busy people, I really appreciated this opportunity!

Ffion and the Presiding Officer, Elin Jones AM

Gruff’s introduction to machine translation was greatly beneficial. It is good to see major companies such as Microsoft investing in technology that benefits the Welsh translation industry. Used properly, this technology increases translators’ productivity and gives non-Welsh speakers the opportunity to understand the language. Of course, machine translation will never be an improvement on real-life translators, but it is good to know that there are resources available to support our work.

Ffion and Gruff

As someone who takes an interest in politics as well as translating, it was great to see First Minister’s Questions in the Chamber. It was nice to feel part of the political process and hear the Welsh language being spoken by Ministers. Listening to the interpreters showcase their talent was amazing. What a skill!

I would like to thank the Urdd, Cymdeithas Cyfieithwyr Cymru (the association of Welsh translators and interpreters) and the Assembly for arranging the day. A heartfelt thanks goes to Iona and Sarah for being such wonderful guides! I would urge those of you who are between 19 and 25 years old and who have an interest in translation to enter the Urdd competition next year. If you are successful, I promise that spending the day with the Assembly’s translation unit will be an invaluable experience!


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Diversity and Inclusion Week – Workplace Equality Networks By Abi Lasebikan, Diversity and Inclusion Officer and Network Coordinator

By Abi Lasebikan, Diversity and Inclusion Officer and Network Coordinator

What are Workplace Equality Networks (WENs)?

As Network Coordinator I see the WENs as a place for people who identify with a protected characteristic group and/or have an interest in matters relating to a particular diversity strand (i.e. gender reassignment, sexual orientation, race, religion/belief, age, pregnancy/maternity, sex, marriage/civil partnership and disability), to come together to:

  • give and receive pastoral care;
  • share information relating to equality; promote equality issues related to their group;
  • access learning opportunities to build skills that will help individuals develop personally as well as in their career, and
  • act as critical agents for change within the organisation.

Who are the WENs open to?

The networks are open to all Assembly Members, AMSS, Commission staff and employees of our on-site contractors to join as either members or as allies, as they recognise that anyone, not only those directly affected, can have an interest in a particular equality issue. This interest can exist for many reasons, including because of a connection to someone who is affected e.g. a child, spouse or relative or because of the belief it’s ‘the right thing’. Allies are welcome because to achieve real Diversity and Inclusion requires a collective effort involving everyone.

What are the benefits of the WENs for the individual?

For an individual the networks can:

  • Provide informal peer support and advice.
  • Offer a platform for discussing issues affecting members of the networks.
  • Enhance career development and progression for staff, through various programmes, including mentoring opportunities.
  • Present networking opportunities.
  • Give members the chance to identify and advise the Assembly Commission on the issues which affect staff, through impact assessment of policies.

What are the benefits of the WENs for the organisation?

Because of their access and insight these networks can help us to:

  • Understand the value in managing and harnessing the potential of an increasingly diverse workforce.
  • Recruit and retain the most talented people.
  • Provide the best service to stakeholders.
  • Make a positive difference to the working culture of the Assembly.

They do this because the collective intelligence of the WENs:

  • Make it possible for us to understand what it is like to work in that environment from the perspective of the members.
  • Enable us to understand our diverse service users.
  • Serve as effective consultative and advisory bodies on diversity related matters.

The networks input leads to better policies and procedures which means happier employees who can be themselves, resulting in an organisation that performs better and is therefore better able to attract and retain top talent.

The Assembly recognises that the networks are instrumental to the organisation in its aim to achieve a safe, inclusive and diverse working environment for all. It supports the networks and would encourage all Assembly Members, Assembly Member Support Staff (AMSS), Commission staff and employees of our on-site contractors to support and enable their staff to participate in and engage with network activities.

Our current networks are:

EMBRACE LOGOEMBRACE – our disability network. It is open to disabled people, those who support disabled people and people with an interest in disability equality. Within EMBRACE are subsidiary dyslexia and chronic pain groups. Chaired by Abi Phillips

 

INSPIRE logoINSPIRE – our women’s network. It’s open to both men and women. Co-chaired by Sarah Crosbie and Janette Iliffe

 

 

OUT NAW logo OUT-NAW – our Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and    Transgender (LGBT) network. It is a closed group for LGBT people, it is open to LGBT people as members and people with an interest in LGBT equality as allies. Co-chaired by Craig Stephenson  and  Jayelle Robinson-Larkin

TEULU logoTEULU – our Working Parent and Carer network, is currently a virtual network that operates mainly online.  New network members and network allies are always welcome. Co-chaired by Holly Pembridge and Joel Steed

REACH logoREACH – The Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Heritage network is our Black Minority Ethnic (BME) network. It is open to BME people as members and people who support race equality as allies. Co-chaired by Abi Lasebikan and Raz Roap

 

The Networks have contributed to and raised the profile of the organisation in a variety of ways. They have:

  • Input into many impact assessment of policies and projects, such as the Accessible Car Parking policy, Human Resources Priority Postings policy, EFM refurbishments projects, etc.
  • Attended events, like: Pride and Sparkle, Stonewall Cymru’s Workplace Equality Index Awards, All Wales Annual Race Equality Conference, Mela, etc.
  • Participated in community incentives, like collecting for the Cardiff Foodbank.
  • Produced a range of blogs, factsheets and guidance on a variety of topics, such as: Ramadan, Cultural Diversity, Invisible Disabilities, Bisexual Awareness, Mental Health, etc.
  • Worked closely with other public sector organisations, such as Gwent and South Wales Police, Welsh Government, Cardiff University, to promote diversity and inclusion.

That is just a flavour of the impressive achievements of the networks. Further information on the networks can be found at: http://members/networks.

Championing the WENs

A senior champion is someone who openly supports the WENs at the highest level of the organisation. They are vocal about the achievements of the network and how it benefits the organisation as well as willing to lend the weight of their leadership to the network. I am pleased to say that both Dave Tosh and Craig Stephenson are not only champions for BME and LGBT issues respectively but have agreed to champion equality issues as a whole on the Management Board.

“As the BME Champion I can act as a voice, at Director level, and work with the network to help support our BME staff to address some of the issues affecting them”. Dave Tosh, Director of Resources and BME Champion

The Champions can also be a beacon to others that the organisation is truly an inclusive organisation that recognises talent, irrespective of whether the person belongs to a protected characteristic group.

“It’s very important that there are visible LGBT people at all levels within the organisation, and also that people see that being from a minority group hasn’t hindered peoples’ ability to reach more senior levels. Personally, I think that if you have reached a position which gives you visibility, and if you can inspire someone else, if you can lead by example, you should.” Craig Stephenson


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Not every disability is visible – ‘Invisible disabilities’

Not every disability is visible image

Image of person with shadow of a person in a wheelchair, with caption ‘Not every disability is visible.’

When people think of disabilities they think of someone in a wheelchair when in fact, according to the English federation of Disability Sport in 2014 there are only around 1.2 million wheelchair users in the UK, roughly 2% of UK population. The reality is a person doesn’t always ‘look’ ill when they’re dealing with a health issue. Despite popular belief the majority of impairments are not visible. Out of the millions of disabled people living in the UK, only a small percentage have illnesses that can actually be seen. These people are living with an invisible disability.

 

What is meant by invisible disability

Not all disabilities look like this image

Image of person and person in a wheelchair with caption ‘Not all disabilities look like this. Some disabilities look like this.’

Invisible disabilities refers to a wide range of conditions and illnesses that are not immediately apparent or visible, and therefore obvious. They include: cognitive dysfunctions; brain injuries; learning difficulties; epilepsy; cancer; diabetes, sickle cell, fibromyalgia; HIV; Aids; gastrointestinal problems; myalgic encephalopathy or myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME); mental health conditions, as well as hearing and visual impairments, to name a few. It is worth noting that someone who has a visible impairment or uses an assistive device such as a wheelchair, walker or cane can also have invisible disabilities, for example a person in a wheelchair may also have a mental health condition.

 

What are the challenges of living with an invisible disability

Like any disabled person a person living with an invisible disability faces stigma, exclusion and discrimination and the constant task of challenging misconceptions about their conditions. However, people with invisible disabilities may not always experience discrimination in the same way as someone with a noticeable disability. They can also face obstacles such as being accused of misusing accessible toilets, disabled parking spaces, and other facilities.

“When somebody doesn’t look ill, it’s easy to make the assumption that they’re lazy or mean or not thinking of others. But when I go to the accessible toilets it’s because I have my ostomy bag and I do need a bit more space and running water.” Sam Cleasby, Disability Campaigner

A person with an invisible disability has a right not to be made to explain their illness to a stranger. We need to understand that for many, using accessible toilets or disabled parking spaces is not a luxury or privilege. It’s a necessity in order for them to lead their lives.

Those who judge are undoubtedly not doing it out of malice, but from a genuine desire to and belief that they’re defending the rights of people who are genuinely in need. But even if that assumption comes from a place of kindness it is best not to make assumptions. You might think you’re doing the right thing, but you could be making it worse for somebody already struggling.

Invisible Disabilities and the National Assembly for Wales

As an employer we recognise that, according to NOMIS’s Annual Population Survey March 2013, 20.8% of the working age population in the UK (8.3 million people) had a disability. We understand that encouraging applications from disabled people is good for business. It can help us to:

  • increase the number of high quality applicants available;
  • create a workforce that reflects the diverse range of customers we serve and the community in which we are based, and
  • bring additional skills to the business, such as the ability to use British Sign Language (BSL), which could result in large savings. The costs of making reasonable adjustments to accommodate disabled employees are often low. The benefits of retaining an experienced, skilled employee who has acquired an impairment are usually greater than recruiting and training new staff. It is also good for the individual.

That is why as an employer, the Assembly is committed to promoting equality of opportunity for Commission staff, Assembly Members and their staff and the people of Wales. We strive to be an inclusive organisation that values everyone that works here, their diverse perspectives, skillsets and range of backgrounds. To that end we are proud to have:

  • A range of facilities on site to ensure that we are an accessible organization: including a range of different toilet facilities such as gender neutral toilets, accessible toilets, a Changing Places facility with adult hoist, and toilets for people with mobility issues. To find out more about our accessible facilities, visit Euan’s Guide, the disabled access review website.
  • Great policies, such as flexible working, including career break, part-time working, job share, term time working, condensed hours working and special leave.

    positive about disabled people

    Positive about disabled people tick logo

  • Signed up to the ‘Positive about Disability’ scheme. A scheme that demonstrates to people that we are positive about employing and retaining disabled people. As part of the scheme we have committed to the two tick guaranteed interview scheme. Guarantying an interview to people with disabilities if they meet the essential requirements for the position.
  • Workplace equality networks within the Assembly open to Assembly Commission staff, Assembly Members and their staff, including EMBRACE – our disability network. These networks provide: informal peer support and advice on diversity, inclusion and equality issues and share information related to equality; promote equality issues related to their group; enhance career development and progression for staff, including mentoring opportunities; and identify issues which affect staff, including advising the Assembly Commission on issues which affect staff through impact assessment of policies.

    Embrace logo image

    Embrace disability network of the National Assembly for Wales logo

  • Health, Safety and Wellbeing and Occupational Health teams, which offer a wide range of services to assist employees in managing their health and well-being. This includes assisting staff returning to work after periods of absence and counselling and support services through the Employee Assistance Programme.

Top things to remember about invisible disabilities:

  • Not everyone with a disability uses a wheelchair or has a physical disability.
  • Many people with invisible disabilities experience, on a daily basis, judgment over using facilities such as accessible toilets and disabled parking spaces, because people cannot see their illness. Don’t make assumptions and never be confrontational or aggressive.
  • They don’t and shouldn’t be made to explain themselves to strangers.
  • With the right support many disabled people are able and willing to work.


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Human Rights in Wales – What are they?

Human rights in Wales date back to 945 when the laws of Hywel Dda were published. The laws were just and good, championing compassion rather than punishment and a sense of respect towards women.

Human rights principles are based on dignity, fairness, equality, respect and autonomy. They are relevant to your day-to-day life and protect your freedom to control your own life.

Human rights are the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world, from birth until death. They apply regardless of where you are from, what you believe or how you choose to live your life. They can never be taken away, although they can sometimes be restricted – for example if a person breaks the law, or in the interests of national security.

They help you to flourish and fulfil your potential through:

  • being safe and protected from harm,
  • being treated fairly and with dignity,
  • living the life you choose, and
  • taking an active part in your community and wider society.

Enshrined within the Human Rights Act, they offer fundamental rights and protections to us all. The protections enshrined in the Act are as follows:

  • Article 2 Right to life
  • Article 3 Freedom from torture and inhuman or degrading treatment
  • Article 4 Freedom from slavery and forced labour
  • Article 5 Right to liberty and security
  • Article 6 Right to a fair trial
  • Article 7 No punishment without law
  • Article 8 Respect for your private and family life, home and correspondence
  • Article 9 Freedom of thought, belief and religion
  • Article 10 Freedom of expression
  • Article 11 Freedom of assembly and association
  • Article 12 Right to marry and start a family
  • Article 13 Right to an effective remedy in case of violation
  • Article 14 Protection from discrimination in respect of these rights and freedoms
  • Protocol 1, Article 1 Right to peaceful enjoyment of your property
  • Protocol 1, Article 2 Right to education
  • Protocol 1, Article 3 Right to participate in free elections
  • Protocol 13, Article 1 Abolition of the death penalty

Further information

Our Research Service recently published a blog article entitled The state of human rights and equality that looks at the standing and future of equality and human rights in Wales.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has a wealth of information about human rights including a video to answer the question What are human rights?, as well as information on how rights are protected and some stories about human rights in action. Their report Is Wales fairer? provides an update on equality and human rights in Wales in 2015.

The Rights Info website has a lot of information on human rights and has produced a short animation explaining human rights.


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Inclusive staff policies

The Assembly is committed to being an employer that supports and respects the diversity of our workforce.

We make sure that all of our staff policies are equality impact assessed to ensure that our benefits do not leave anyone at a disadvantage and apply equally to all staff, including disabled staff; staff from a black or minority ethnic background; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender staff; women; people with caring responsibilities; staff with flexible working arrangements. To help us make suitable policies that recognise the different needs of different people, we consult with our workplace equality networks, Diversity and Inclusion Team and TUS colleagues.

We have received a number of accolades that demonstrate our commitment to fully supporting our staff and fostering an inclusive working environment. These standards acknowledge the progressive staff policies that we have in place and help us to maintain a best practice approach. The Assembly has:

  • Achieved the Investors in People Gold Standard, the highest recognition of our commitment to our staff,
  • Been recognised as a top employer for working families,
  • Been listed in The Times Top 50 Employers for Women,
  • Achieved the Action on Hearing Loss, Louder than Words Charter Mark and an Excellence Wales Award which demonstrates that we are committed to meeting the needs of staff and service users who are deaf or have a hearing loss,
  • Been awarded the National Autistic Society’s Autism Access Award which recognises premises who commit to making sure that autistic visitors receive the same warm welcome as everybody else.
  • Been recognised by Stonewall as the Top gay-friendly Public Sector Employer in Wales for the last three years, and ranked number 3 in Stonewall’s Workplace Equality Index 2016 of the top employers in the UK.
  • Made a commitment to be an Age Champion, and
  • Made a commitment to be Positive about Disabled People

Several logos for external recognition recieved by the Assembly. Stonewall Top Employer for LGBT people, Age Positive, Positive About Disabiled People, Investors in People Gold, Action on Hearing Loss Charter Mark, Working Families Top Employers, and National Autistic Society Access Award

 


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The Inclusive Assembly: Diversity and Inclusion

By Holly Pembridge, Head of Diversity and Inclusion, National Assembly for Wales

This week, we are celebrating Diversity and Inclusion Week in the Assembly, which is a series of events and other awareness-raising activities to promote and celebrate us being a diverse and inclusive organisation. We will post a new blog article each day this week. As part of this week, it therefore seems an apt time to reflect on the work that has gone into nurturing an inclusive organisational culture since the Assembly was established. As we begin to develop a new Diversity and Inclusion Strategy and Plan for the Fifth Assembly, we look at how we can continue to build equality, diversity and inclusion considerations into our role as an employer and as an organisation that interacts with the people of Wales.

Our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Vision and Values

Our vision is to be an exemplar organisation in our commitment to promoting equality, valuing diversity and respecting human rights. Our values include the notion that equality of opportunity for all is a basic human right and actively oppose all forms of discrimination. We strive to create an accessible parliamentary body, which engages with and respects all of the people of Wales.

“I believe it is important that the Assembly leads the way in promoting an inclusive organisational culture and that it is a modern, accessible parliamentary body with which people from a diverse range of backgrounds can easily and meaningfully interact. It is incumbent on us as the National Assembly for Wales to lead on this and share our experiences, ensuring that the values of equality, diversity and inclusion are respected and practiced by all, ” said Elin Jones AM, LLywydd, National Assembly for Wales.

Fostering an inclusive, collaborative organisational culture

Here, we are keen to ensure that people can realise their full potential and make contributions when they can be themselves in their working environment. To this end, we organise awareness-raising information and events regularly in order to generate discussion and promote an inclusive culture where difference is celebrated and valued. One way in which the Assembly has signalled to its workforce that it is committed to doing this is by encouraging the establishment of self-managed workplace equality networks. We have networks for LGBT people and their allies; disabled people and their allies, people who identify as Black Minority Ethnic (BME) and their allies; people who identify as working parents and carers; and women and men. People who contribute to the networks do so in addition to their day jobs. It is safe to say that the existence of networks helps to promote inter-cultural insight, foster good relations and offer solutions when barriers to inclusion might arise or have the potential to arise. The concepts of peer support and providing a ‘safe space’ where people can raise issues or offer suggestions for improvement are invaluable and we have examples of where workplace policies and practices have been enhanced. For more information about the Assembly’s workplace equality networks, contact diversity@assembly.wales

Engaging with a diverse range of people inside and outside the Assembly

Having a highly visible Diversity and Inclusion team dedicated to the co-ordination of this work across the Assembly has been beneficial for two reasons in particular. Firstly, good practice and collaborative working with colleagues across the different teams can ensure that we are constantly striving as an organisation to maintain and enhance an inclusive organisational culture. Secondly, we have been able to work with teams across the Assembly and involve people from both in and outside the Assembly to optimise our accessibility to the people of Wales. Our Outreach Team works with individuals and organisations from communities across Wales, raising awareness of the work of the Assembly and encouraging people to become involved in its work.

As a Diversity and Inclusion Team, we value the opportunities we have had to share best practice and learn from others both inside and outside of the Assembly. It is crucial that organisations share where things have worked well and not so well; it saves time and energy and can help to re-focus priorities.

If you would like to help shape the Assembly’s new Diversity and Inclusion Plan, please take our very short survey or contact the Diversity Team on 0300 200 7455 or diversity@assembly.wales

 

 

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